What the 10 Sefirot Reveal?

Tonight is the hillula of the Arizal, one of the greatest kabbalists of all time and to whom we owe most of our understanding (even if only on a limited basis) of the Tree-of-life. It is in his merit that we share today new revelations about the Tree-of-life. And as Abulafia said, nothing gets revealed without heavenly permission; everything in its time. As you’ll see now is the time. Rabbi Chaim Vital of blessed memory, the Arizal’s prized student and redactor, explained that the Tree-of-life was directly connected to the 42-Letter Name through the 10 sefirot (dimensions and 32 Paths of Wisdom that interconnect them, but it seemed in conflict with other commentary that described it was 10 sefirot and 22 linkages for a total of 32. Nevertheless, what neither he, nor anyone that we know of, has ever written about is that the 42-Letter Name also connect to the Tree-of-Life through the 42 letters in the 11 Names of the sefirot (including the all-important balancing dimension of Da’at, located between Chochma and Binah).

Now, we can’t tell you how they interact–anymore than Chaim Vital did over 400 years ago–but we do know, as the sages have told us, that it’s the understanding of the 42-Letter Name that will bring the geula (final redemption) and we can show you how the 42 letters of the 11 Names in the Tree-of-life mathematically spell out the date for the geula, the same date given to us by Rav Yehuda Halevi Ashlag, of blessed memory.

But first let’s examine what a little understanding can connect us to. First and foremost we must understand that, as explained by Abraham in his Sefer Yetzirah, the Hebrew letters are the building blocks of the universe and that how they recombine determines both the physical and spiritual (energetic) structure of the universe, so they are a lot more than squiggles on a page. Every word and name they form has significant individual meaning with far-flung consequences we can’t see nor fathom. And it’s only through the translation of gematria and simple mathematics that we get even a glimpse into that deeper meaning and purpose.

The 11 Names of the sefirot that make up the dimensional structure of our greater universe (Keter, Chochma, Binah, Da’at, Chesed, Gevurah, Tiferet, Netzach, Hod, Yesod, and Malchut are spelled in Hebrew:

CTR

ChCMH

BYNH

DAT

ChSD

GBVRH

TGERT

NZCh

HVD

YSVD

MLCVT

It’s well known from the writings of the Arizal that the initials of these sefirot (without the inclusion of Da’at connect to the 5 letters of the name Israel through it’s value (541+5 = 546), and some people know that the first 4 initials of the upper sefirot (Keter, Chochma, Binah, Da’at) add up to 32, as in the 32 Pathways themselves. But what no one has written about that we know of is that there are 11 sefirot, 22 outer letters in the 11 Names, and 20 inner letters, and that the ordinal value for the letter C, T, and R, spelling Keter (CTR) are 11, 22, and 20; therefore, it’s through the spelling of these 11 Names that we can eventually connect to Keter, the crowning sefira.

And the timing for accessing that crowning level is found within the numerical value of the first and last letters of the 11 sefirot: 1985 plus 32 for the kolel of the 32 Paths equals 2017 (5778). Morever, the total value of the 42 letters in the 11 sefirot is 3342 and 3342- 11 (kolel) = 3331. And 3331 years (66.6 jubilee years) from 2448 HC, when the Israelites left Egypt and received the 10 Commandments, equals the end of the year 5778 and a new beginning, for it’s in the beginning where we found the 42-Letter Name and the Tree-of-Life.

Ezra

A similar parallel exists between the structure of the Tree-of-life and 10 plagues that preceded the last opportunity we had for achieving the Tree-of-life reality.

The 11 initials of the 10 plagues numerically equate to 541, the numerical value of Israel. The last two initials of the 11 words in the 10 plagues are M-B, as in the Shem MB, the 42-Letter Name. And with that, we’ll segue into the hidden spear in Washington DC that also points to 2018 (5778 HC) in our next article.

The Covenant of Peace; A Date is Revealed

In the Torah portion Pinchas, we find a broken letter vav(V) in the phrase “The Covenant of Peace,” the reward given to Pinchas by G-d for selflessly stopping the plague with his spear. Last week we revealed a new, yet ancient, and very telling gematria cipher, and when applied to “The Covenant of Peace,” a date is revealed, the same date given to us by Rav Yehuda HaLevi Ashlag and the tzaddikim for the geula (final redemption).

First, we must note that the Hebrew letters are like holograms in that even a part of them contains the entire image (letter). Thus the broken vav (V), shaped like Pinchas’ spear, is numerically equal to two Vavs(V,V). That said, The Covenant of Peace,” Et Briti Shalom (ET BRYTY ShLVM) has a total new gematria value 2017 when the kolel for the 12 letters is included. The year 2017 CE is the beginning of the year 5778 HC that Rav Ashlag and others have given for the revelation of the Tree-of-life reality.

Moreover, if we only consider a singular vav in the word Peace (Shalom), in other words, if we consider it as a broken peace, the new gematria reveals the year 2010, leaving us the 8 years of the Brit (covenant) of Moshiach (the Messiah, also know as the Prince of Peace) to complete the tumultuous “birthpages of Moshiach,” as the sages and prophets have described it in 5778.

In the next few days, we’ll also reveal how a revered representation of that same spear in Washington D.C. reveals this same date, but by a different and no less telling method. And also how the 42 letters of the Tree-of-life’s 10 sefirot (dimensions) also give us the date 2017.

Shabbat Shalom

Ezra.

Reveal the Concealed; The Megillah Ester

Have an amazing Purim everyone! And let us all connect to H’Mashiach and Hashem through the concealed. It is up to us the reveal them in our lives and world, the world of Malchut. This is what the Megillah Ester and the so-called traditions (actually the technology)of Purim allows us to do. There was a wonderful extended comment at the DailyZohar.com by Chaim that I would like to shared with everyone.

One of the many things Chaim shows us is how all the sefirot (dimensions) are included in the text of the Book of Ester except the sefira of Netzach and he deftly explains why. The only thing I would add to Chaim’s article is that the word Netzach, representing the 4th sefira, that of victory associated with Moshe Rabbeinu, is found once in the amazingly encoded Book of Ester. At Ester 6:4 it is found backwards and combined every other letter with the Name of G-d (YHVH):  HChYZVNH.  This, like all the technology built into the Megillah Ester, is no coincidence and strengthens Chaim’s learned hypothesis as G-d chose to conceal himself within Netzach. There are numerous other times throughout the reading that the names of G-d are similarly encoded within words or phrases, and it is through their ultimate revelation that the Light shines into our lives.

Chag Sameach,

Purim Sameach,

Ezra

Please read Chaim’s article in its entirety

Chaim says:

February 26, 2010 at 5:01 am

The Megilah and Kabbalistic Terminology

It is not surprising that hidden within the text of the book of Esther, one may find numerous allusions to concepts and terms which in subsequent generations were to become mainstays of Kabbalistic discourse. Aside from the importance accorded the Hebrew root of the word Kabbalah (k-b-l) itself (Esther 4:4: “And [Esther] sent garments with which to clothe Mordechai…but he did not accept (kibel) [them]“; Esther 9:23: “And the Jews accepted (kiblu) that which they had begun to do…”; Esther 9:27: “The Jews established and accepted upon themselves, and upon their seed”), we find many other significant word-roots appearing there as well.

Of the eleven names for the sefirot–the basic Divine forces of Creation–all but one explicitly appear in the book of Esther.

Keter appears in 1:11, 2:17, and 6:1;

Chochmah in 1:13 and 6:13;

Binah in 3:8; da’at in 1:13;

Chesed in 2:17;

Gevurah in 10:2;

Tiferet in 1:4;

Hod in 2:5, 3:4, et al;

Yesod in 1:8,

And malchut in 1:7,11,19 et al.

The only sefirotic term missing in the book is netzach, as we will explain further on.

No other Biblical text exhibits such a density of Kabbalistic idiom. The fact that this abundance of mystical expression coexists alongside a total absence of reference to G-d Himself can perhaps be understood by way of analogy to a panorama of stars that only becomes visible when the radiance of the sun has receded from view.

The term sefirah itself, perhaps the most basic within the lexicon of Kabbalah, finds repeated expression in this book through the related term sefer , “book” (Esther 2:23, 6:1, 10:2, 9:25, 32, et al), constructed from the same Hebrew root, s-f-r.

This root bears three distinct connotations, all of which are reflected in the meaning of the word sefirah. As an “emanation” of Divine light, the term sefirah is derived from the Biblical sapir, “sapphire,” whose brilliant radiance is associated with the heavenly throne and footstool envisioned by the prophets.

The term sefirah also alludes to a specific attribute or trait by which G-d expresses Himself in the world. As such, it reflects an additional connotation of the root s-f-r, that of “articulation,” as in the words sippur (“story”) and sefer (“book”). Unlike the transcendent association with Divine light, this aspect of the root s-f-r implies a more immediate and relatable context through which to identify with G-d.

Finally, the term sefirah often alludes to the abstract mathematical structure of Creation–as evoked by the word mispar (“number”). In this sense, the concept of sefirah is only obliquely connected to Divinity–reflecting a dimension which, albeit exquisitely abstract, attaches to the created realm itself.

The association between the term sefirah and the word sefer, which as we just saw is based upon the idea of articulation or expressiveness, is underscored by the fact that the book of Esther itself is called a megilah (“scroll”), based upon the root gilah, “to reveal.”

The physical form of the scroll itself reinforces this sense of revelation by contributing to the reader’s experience of the text as a gradually unfolding message or insight. This effect is heightened even further by the use of the sippur (“narrative medium”) as the literary format for communicating the message of the scroll. In the sippur there is a constant tension deriving from the selective revelation of certain plot-elements and not others. The gradual clarification of all the hidden aspects within a story brings with it a cathartic resolution of that tension and a much deeper connection to the literary themes evoked in the process. No other account in all of Scripture takes such full advantage of the narrative medium as the story of Esther.

The Kabbalistic tradition also resorts to allegorical narrative when attempting to communicate its profound truths–as such form of exposition often proves more illuminating than abstract theosophical discourse. The story of Creation and of man’s first hours in Eden provides Kabbalah with a key narrative structure for presenting the cosmic background to man’s existence. Given the connection that we have seen between the book of Esther and Kabbalistic tradition, it should not surprise us, then, that the story of Esther is in fact interpreted in Kabbalah as symbolic of the initial drama that transpired in Eden at the dawn of Creation, when the first man and woman were tempted into eating from the Tree of Knowledge. The key figures in the book of Esther are seen as representing the regenerated souls (gilgulim) of the players in that great drama, come to rectify their prior “fall.” Esther, by vanquishing the serpent Haman, provides necessary restitution for the tragic flaw in Creation engendered by her primordial ancestor, Eve.

The most frequently mentioned sefirotic term in the book of Esther is malchut. No other Biblical text contains such a concentration of references to the term malchut. Out of a total of 167 verses in the book, there are over 240 appearances of the root melech. In one verse (Esther 4:11), the word hamelech actually appears five times. In another verse (Esther 5:1), the root melech appears in variant forms a full six times! This itself is a major indication of the Book of Esther’s strong Kabbalistic character, as malchut is the key to understanding the entire drama of Creation according to the Kabbalah.

The root melech appears most often in context of the word hamelech (“the king”), referring to the Persian King Achashverosh. It is commonly explained that the various references in the book of Esther to King Achashverosh can otherwise be interpreted as veiled allusions to the King of Kings, Master of the universe. The fact that he is always referred to as hamelech (the king) would seems to corroborate this tradition. The letter hei, serving as definite article in the word hamelech, is the letter associated in Kabbalah with the sefirah of malchut–corresponding to the final hei in G-d’s essential four-letter Name.

Another indication of the Kabbalistic spirit infusing the text is the fact that the word keter (alluding to the first Divine emanation) always appears in conjunction with the word malchut (alluding to the last). The expression keter malchut (“the royal crown”) hints at a basic Kabbalistic phenomenon, described by Sefer Yetzirah in the following language: “its end (the sefirah of malchut) is enwedged in its beginning (that of keter) as its beginning is enwedged in its end.” (The introduction of the Tikunei Zohar [s.v. Patach Eliahu] also states: “the supernal keter is the keter of malchut.”)

Interestingly enough, the second most frequently mentioned sefirah in the book of Esther is hod. The relationship between hod and malchut is a very significant one, insofar as we are told in Kabbalah that ihi b’hod–”she (the sefirah of malchut) is in hod.” In the very first verse of the book, we already find an allusion to the strong association between these two terms–as it states there hu Achashverosh hamolech mehodu v’ad kush. Elsewhere (in Daniel 11:21 and I Chronicles 29:25), the two terms combine into the idiom hod malchut (“the aura of majesty”), an expression used often in addressing royalty.

The only sefirotic term missing in the book is netzach, the seventh sefirah and one which has unique relevance to the holiday of Purim at which time the events of the book of Esther are commemorated. (The Arizal states that it is on Purim that the sefirah of netzach achieves its tikkun, i.e. rectified expression.) It would thus appear that the absence of the term netzach from the text, like the absence of G-d’s Name, actually points in a paradoxical way to the term’s pervasive, and thus unrecognizable, presence throughout the book as a whole. A further indication of there being an equivalence between the term netzach and G-d’s Name is the fact that of all the names identified with the sefirot, netzach is the only one which appears in Scripture (I Samuel 15:29) as poetically descriptive of G-d Himself: Netzach Yisrael (“the Eternity of Israel”).

The essential relevance of netzach to the book of Esther derives from its dual connotation of both “victory” and “eternity.” As “victory,” netzach represents the capacity to overcome adversity. As “eternity,” it implies the capacity to even overcome the adversity of death itself. The “eternity of Israel,” and of its struggle against the nation of Amalek (their Biblical arch-enemy, representing the forces of doubt and indifference, especially with regard to faith in Divine providence), are the central themes of the book of Esther and of the Purim holiday associated with it. Our sages teach us that in Messianic times all the holidays we presently observe will be annulled except for Purim–meaning that the intensity of Divine revelation at that time will virtually blind out the significance of the other holidays, but not that of Purim. The same is said with regard to the status of the book of Esther vis-a-vis the other books of the Prophets and Ketuvim. This is actually alluded to in the book of Esther itself (9:28): “And these days of Purim shall never pass from among the Jews nor shall their commemoration ever cease from among their seed.”

The Hebrew expression lo yasuf (“shall never cease”) in the above verse recalls the term ein sof (“endlessness,” or “the Infinite One”), the idiom in Kabbalah expressing G-d’s essential existence beyond time and space. (The initial letters of ein sof, the alef and samech,are also the first two letters in Esther’s name.) It is interesting to note that we find an idiomatic expression of eternity in each of the three places where the Bible explicitly recounts the campaign against Amalek: In the Pentateuch itself, where Moses and Joshua lead the battle, we are told of “G-d’s war against Amalek from generation to generation” (Exodus 17:16); in the Prophets, where Samuel contends with the Amalekite King, Agag, we encounter the Divine appelation referred to above–Netzach Yisrael, the Eternity of Israel; and in the Ketuvim, where Mordechai and Esther vanquish the Amalekite Haman, we have the expression just mentioned, lo yasuf.

Hence we see that the concept of netzach is implicit throughout the book of Esther. It can be said that it “surrounds” the book as well–for we find explicit reference to the term both before and after the book is formally read on the holiday of Purim. The prior reference appears in context of the haftarah (“appended Scriptural portion”) read on the Sabbath before the Purim holiday, in which the central verse (Samuel 15:29) reads: “Netzach Yisrael lo yeshaker”–”the Eternity of Israel does not prevaricate.” The subsequent reference appears in the short elegy, “Shoshanat Yaakov,” which is recited after the book of Esther has been read in public. The word netzach appears there twice, in the sentence that reads teshuatam hayita lanetzach (“you were their eternal salvation”) and in that which reads lo yekalmu lanetzach kol hachosim bach (“those who find refuge in You shall for all of eternity never be humiliated”).

Hence, in one form or another, all of the sefirot are hinted at in the Megillah, establishing a unique connection between this most esoteric of Scriptural texts and the Kabbalistic tradition as a whole.

The Power of 3; Your Life Depends on it.

Before we reveal the measure of the ancient and future cubit, it is imperative that we understand the universal concept of 3. A true understanding of the sefirot (dimensions) and what their names signify is beyond all of us. It’s like trying to tell someone without a sense of smell or taste what freshly made ice cream, chocolate, or warm homemade apple pie is like, and even that analogy is very weak by comparison. We can’t even fathom them. And this is why the universe (Hashem) has given us the Ana B’koach (42-Letter Name of G-d); it serves as our nexus to the spiritual world.

Know that the light that our world depends on gets channeled through the Supernal Holy Temple in a balanced way, and that much of the power behind the number 3 lies in the balance struck between the first 3 sefirotChesed, Gevurah and Tiferet of Zeir Anpin–but what can that possibly mean for us?

Chesed is Loving-kindness, or the unconditional Love that Hashem has for us, which is why the first line, associated with Chesed, of the Ana B’koach has a numerical value of 506, that of Ahavatchinam (Unconditional love). This the love and joy of perpetual giving, the unceasing love and desire for our well-being that Hashem showers on us constantly. This is wonderful, but what place does that leave us in this universe? What purpose would we serve other than to take from G-d, which is why there is a 2nd phase for this light, one that allows us to participate and grow within the universe, utilizing the concept of free will.

The second line corresponds with judgment, din, the natural phase of the light where our actions receive immediate and just reactions, which we see as punishments and the universe sees as simple physics.

You step on someone’s toe, someone else steps on yours. Simple enough, and if we’d learn right away from that it would be a good thing and we’d all live easier more righteous lives. But what happens if the person whose toe we stepped on gets an infection from it and dies, or he later pushes someone too far because of the bad mood we set up for him and that person creates a negativity chain that winds up in someone else’s personal ruin or death? Would we want that punishment for ourselves? The universe holds us responsible and we’d have to pay (eye-for-an-eye) for that entire chain of negativity (action by action). That’s why there is a 3rd phase of the light, mercy, rachem.

Taken together the numerical value of chesed, and din is 72 + 64 + kolel(1)= 137, which is that of the work Kabablah, meaning “to receive,” but to receive this light in a balanced way we need the third phase, just as the electrons and protons need the neutrons to form stable and useful atoms.

Taken together the numerical value of chesed, din, and rachem is 72 + 64 + 248 +Kolel (3)= 387, which is that of the 3rd line of the Ana B’koach (NGD YCSh), which is structured to balance the light of loving kindness and judgment into life-sustaining mercy.

With mercy, our judgment are mitigated and we’re given time to reflect on and make amends for our actions. Think of the first line and sefira of chesed as space, the 2nd as motion, and the 3rd as time, completing the physics of “time, space and motion.” We can use this 3rd line of the Ana B’koach (NGD YCSh) combined with spiritual and heart-felt intentions to further mitigate our judgments, and we should start seeing life as a string of merciful incidents rather than as one of punishments.
For example, a minor fender-bender as inconvenient as it might be, may very well be a merciful way to spare you of a fatal car crash that some action in your past inadvertently warranted. Seeing life as filled with mercy is a big step forward toward reaching the Tree-of-life reality where the mercy will be inherent, obvious and universal. Until we’re there, we have the gift of the Ana B’koach. (get and read The Genesis Prayer if you don’t have it).

In our next article we’ll reveal the ancient and future cubit and you’ll understand why comprehending this concept of 3 and balance was important to grasp first.

With Love,

Ezra

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