Purim, Removing the Masks, Part I: New Revelations from the Beginning

It is said that Purim will be the only holiday that we’ll celebrate after the final redemption, but if all the holidays are based on cosmic windows, what separates Purim in the grand scheme of cosmic time? There is obviously some special connection between Purim and the times of Moshiach or the sages wouldn’t have made this special distinction.  We read about Purim in the Book of Ester so that’s where we must search for the answer.

It’s known that the Book of Esther is all about concealment, which is why we celebrate it with a costume party, but like the Torah there are layers of concealment.  The Name of G-d isn’t overtly mentioned in the Book of Ester, but it is found numerous times as the initials of phrases, often as permuted versions (ie YHVH, YHHV, VHYH). The Name Ehyeh (EHYH) is also found in the same manner, as are triplets of the 42-Letter Name and the 72 Names of G-d , but these are all relatively easy to find.

As we are so close to the time of Moshiach and the end of the 70 year period from the foundation of the State of Israel, we should be able to dig deeper, we sho9uld be able to reveal even more.  After all, the Book of Ester, marked the final years of the 70-year Babylonia exile.

It’s OK to get happy and a little inebriated on Purim in order to shed your mask and reveal the inner light within you, but the Baal Shem Tov and his students got drunk on Torah on Purim and so must we if we want to reveal the inner light within the holiday, the light of Moshiach (the Messiah) and Creation.

The story begins by telling us King Ahasuerus, who ruled over 127 provinces, displayed his wealth for 180 + 7 days for a total of 187 days.

Queen Vashti, his wife and equal, held her own party with her 7 maidens for the same final 7 days. On the 7th day, Ahasuerus consulted his 7 chamberlains.

The initials of the first two were Mem and Bet, an obvious allusion to the Shem Mem Bet (42-Letter Name) and also an indication that a journey would begin, as all Torah journeys begin with the Mem-Bet. The total value of their initials is 73, the numerical value of the sefira(dimension) of Chochma (wisdom), associated with both the 42-Letter Name and the Torah’s first verse, of 7 words, whose numerical value is 2701, which is also the sum of all the integers through 73.

Please keep in mind that at the heart of the Book of Ester is about removing Amalek (kabbalistic code for doubts) from our lives in order to bring about Mashiach, the geula (final redemption) and the Tree-0f-life reality, so just in case skepticism were to creep in and ruin it for us, the Book of Ester made certain we wouldn’t miss the connection to Chochma. The ordinal value of Chochma (CChMH) is 37, which is also the ordinal value of the initials of the 7 chamberlains (MBEBEZC).  Moreover, 37 x 73, the inner and surrounding light of Chochma equals 2701.

And as if that weren’t enough to grab our attention the last two chamberlain “Zether and Carcus” add up to 913, the same as the Torah’s first word, bereshit.

Oh, and by the way, those 187 days of display are analogous to the 187 chapters in the Torah, as are the 5 Parts of the Book of Esther analogous to the 5 Books of the Torah.

While the sages tell us Queen Ester was an incarnation of Sarah, the Matriarch, who live 127 years, 127 is also the number of ways any 7 items can be permuted, such as the 7 words in the Torah’s first verse, the 7 lines in the 42-Letter Name matrix, or the 7 dimensions (sefirot) in Zeir Apin, the ladder between Heaven and Earth to which both of them are associated.

We’re only at the 10th verse of the first of 10 chapters in the Book of Esther, an oft overlooked part except to the kabbalists, yet the 10 chapters in themselves is a hint that the Book of Esther may be about the necessary rectification of the 10 sefirot that comprise the Tree-of-life.

This 10th verse begins with  “On the 7th day, when the Kings heart was merry with wine” but let’s break that down, the 7th day is analogous to Shabbat, the 7th and final day of creation and “the King” to Hashem (G-d), and k’tov (was merry) has the numerical value of 37 once again and literally say was good, so the inner light of wisdom was good–the timing was right. The heart of the king (LV-HMLC) has the numerical value 127 once again, indicating that the timing was right to bridge the gap between Heaven and Earth, and with wine (B’YYN) can be understood as “in 70“. Thus the story is really telling us that in 70 years, the timing will be right for the re-establishment of the Tree-of-life reality, just as it was right for Ezra to bring the Israelites home from Persia after their 70 years of exile.

If you like how the Book of Ester’s revelations have begun you’ll love how it ends. In the next installment, we’ll reveal how the Hamelehk (The King) and the names of the other characters in the Purim story all reveal the same date for Moshiach’s manifestation.

Stay tuned for Part II

Reveal the Concealed; The Megillah Ester

Have an amazing Purim everyone! And let us all connect to H’Mashiach and Hashem through the concealed. It is up to us the reveal them in our lives and world, the world of Malchut. This is what the Megillah Ester and the so-called traditions (actually the technology)of Purim allows us to do. There was a wonderful extended comment at the DailyZohar.com by Chaim that I would like to shared with everyone.

One of the many things Chaim shows us is how all the sefirot (dimensions) are included in the text of the Book of Ester except the sefira of Netzach and he deftly explains why. The only thing I would add to Chaim’s article is that the word Netzach, representing the 4th sefira, that of victory associated with Moshe Rabbeinu, is found once in the amazingly encoded Book of Ester. At Ester 6:4 it is found backwards and combined every other letter with the Name of G-d (YHVH):  HChYZVNH.  This, like all the technology built into the Megillah Ester, is no coincidence and strengthens Chaim’s learned hypothesis as G-d chose to conceal himself within Netzach. There are numerous other times throughout the reading that the names of G-d are similarly encoded within words or phrases, and it is through their ultimate revelation that the Light shines into our lives.

Chag Sameach,

Purim Sameach,

Ezra

Please read Chaim’s article in its entirety

Chaim says:

February 26, 2010 at 5:01 am

The Megilah and Kabbalistic Terminology

It is not surprising that hidden within the text of the book of Esther, one may find numerous allusions to concepts and terms which in subsequent generations were to become mainstays of Kabbalistic discourse. Aside from the importance accorded the Hebrew root of the word Kabbalah (k-b-l) itself (Esther 4:4: “And [Esther] sent garments with which to clothe Mordechai…but he did not accept (kibel) [them]“; Esther 9:23: “And the Jews accepted (kiblu) that which they had begun to do…”; Esther 9:27: “The Jews established and accepted upon themselves, and upon their seed”), we find many other significant word-roots appearing there as well.

Of the eleven names for the sefirot–the basic Divine forces of Creation–all but one explicitly appear in the book of Esther.

Keter appears in 1:11, 2:17, and 6:1;

Chochmah in 1:13 and 6:13;

Binah in 3:8; da’at in 1:13;

Chesed in 2:17;

Gevurah in 10:2;

Tiferet in 1:4;

Hod in 2:5, 3:4, et al;

Yesod in 1:8,

And malchut in 1:7,11,19 et al.

The only sefirotic term missing in the book is netzach, as we will explain further on.

No other Biblical text exhibits such a density of Kabbalistic idiom. The fact that this abundance of mystical expression coexists alongside a total absence of reference to G-d Himself can perhaps be understood by way of analogy to a panorama of stars that only becomes visible when the radiance of the sun has receded from view.

The term sefirah itself, perhaps the most basic within the lexicon of Kabbalah, finds repeated expression in this book through the related term sefer , “book” (Esther 2:23, 6:1, 10:2, 9:25, 32, et al), constructed from the same Hebrew root, s-f-r.

This root bears three distinct connotations, all of which are reflected in the meaning of the word sefirah. As an “emanation” of Divine light, the term sefirah is derived from the Biblical sapir, “sapphire,” whose brilliant radiance is associated with the heavenly throne and footstool envisioned by the prophets.

The term sefirah also alludes to a specific attribute or trait by which G-d expresses Himself in the world. As such, it reflects an additional connotation of the root s-f-r, that of “articulation,” as in the words sippur (“story”) and sefer (“book”). Unlike the transcendent association with Divine light, this aspect of the root s-f-r implies a more immediate and relatable context through which to identify with G-d.

Finally, the term sefirah often alludes to the abstract mathematical structure of Creation–as evoked by the word mispar (“number”). In this sense, the concept of sefirah is only obliquely connected to Divinity–reflecting a dimension which, albeit exquisitely abstract, attaches to the created realm itself.

The association between the term sefirah and the word sefer, which as we just saw is based upon the idea of articulation or expressiveness, is underscored by the fact that the book of Esther itself is called a megilah (“scroll”), based upon the root gilah, “to reveal.”

The physical form of the scroll itself reinforces this sense of revelation by contributing to the reader’s experience of the text as a gradually unfolding message or insight. This effect is heightened even further by the use of the sippur (“narrative medium”) as the literary format for communicating the message of the scroll. In the sippur there is a constant tension deriving from the selective revelation of certain plot-elements and not others. The gradual clarification of all the hidden aspects within a story brings with it a cathartic resolution of that tension and a much deeper connection to the literary themes evoked in the process. No other account in all of Scripture takes such full advantage of the narrative medium as the story of Esther.

The Kabbalistic tradition also resorts to allegorical narrative when attempting to communicate its profound truths–as such form of exposition often proves more illuminating than abstract theosophical discourse. The story of Creation and of man’s first hours in Eden provides Kabbalah with a key narrative structure for presenting the cosmic background to man’s existence. Given the connection that we have seen between the book of Esther and Kabbalistic tradition, it should not surprise us, then, that the story of Esther is in fact interpreted in Kabbalah as symbolic of the initial drama that transpired in Eden at the dawn of Creation, when the first man and woman were tempted into eating from the Tree of Knowledge. The key figures in the book of Esther are seen as representing the regenerated souls (gilgulim) of the players in that great drama, come to rectify their prior “fall.” Esther, by vanquishing the serpent Haman, provides necessary restitution for the tragic flaw in Creation engendered by her primordial ancestor, Eve.

The most frequently mentioned sefirotic term in the book of Esther is malchut. No other Biblical text contains such a concentration of references to the term malchut. Out of a total of 167 verses in the book, there are over 240 appearances of the root melech. In one verse (Esther 4:11), the word hamelech actually appears five times. In another verse (Esther 5:1), the root melech appears in variant forms a full six times! This itself is a major indication of the Book of Esther’s strong Kabbalistic character, as malchut is the key to understanding the entire drama of Creation according to the Kabbalah.

The root melech appears most often in context of the word hamelech (“the king”), referring to the Persian King Achashverosh. It is commonly explained that the various references in the book of Esther to King Achashverosh can otherwise be interpreted as veiled allusions to the King of Kings, Master of the universe. The fact that he is always referred to as hamelech (the king) would seems to corroborate this tradition. The letter hei, serving as definite article in the word hamelech, is the letter associated in Kabbalah with the sefirah of malchut–corresponding to the final hei in G-d’s essential four-letter Name.

Another indication of the Kabbalistic spirit infusing the text is the fact that the word keter (alluding to the first Divine emanation) always appears in conjunction with the word malchut (alluding to the last). The expression keter malchut (“the royal crown”) hints at a basic Kabbalistic phenomenon, described by Sefer Yetzirah in the following language: “its end (the sefirah of malchut) is enwedged in its beginning (that of keter) as its beginning is enwedged in its end.” (The introduction of the Tikunei Zohar [s.v. Patach Eliahu] also states: “the supernal keter is the keter of malchut.”)

Interestingly enough, the second most frequently mentioned sefirah in the book of Esther is hod. The relationship between hod and malchut is a very significant one, insofar as we are told in Kabbalah that ihi b’hod–”she (the sefirah of malchut) is in hod.” In the very first verse of the book, we already find an allusion to the strong association between these two terms–as it states there hu Achashverosh hamolech mehodu v’ad kush. Elsewhere (in Daniel 11:21 and I Chronicles 29:25), the two terms combine into the idiom hod malchut (“the aura of majesty”), an expression used often in addressing royalty.

The only sefirotic term missing in the book is netzach, the seventh sefirah and one which has unique relevance to the holiday of Purim at which time the events of the book of Esther are commemorated. (The Arizal states that it is on Purim that the sefirah of netzach achieves its tikkun, i.e. rectified expression.) It would thus appear that the absence of the term netzach from the text, like the absence of G-d’s Name, actually points in a paradoxical way to the term’s pervasive, and thus unrecognizable, presence throughout the book as a whole. A further indication of there being an equivalence between the term netzach and G-d’s Name is the fact that of all the names identified with the sefirot, netzach is the only one which appears in Scripture (I Samuel 15:29) as poetically descriptive of G-d Himself: Netzach Yisrael (“the Eternity of Israel”).

The essential relevance of netzach to the book of Esther derives from its dual connotation of both “victory” and “eternity.” As “victory,” netzach represents the capacity to overcome adversity. As “eternity,” it implies the capacity to even overcome the adversity of death itself. The “eternity of Israel,” and of its struggle against the nation of Amalek (their Biblical arch-enemy, representing the forces of doubt and indifference, especially with regard to faith in Divine providence), are the central themes of the book of Esther and of the Purim holiday associated with it. Our sages teach us that in Messianic times all the holidays we presently observe will be annulled except for Purim–meaning that the intensity of Divine revelation at that time will virtually blind out the significance of the other holidays, but not that of Purim. The same is said with regard to the status of the book of Esther vis-a-vis the other books of the Prophets and Ketuvim. This is actually alluded to in the book of Esther itself (9:28): “And these days of Purim shall never pass from among the Jews nor shall their commemoration ever cease from among their seed.”

The Hebrew expression lo yasuf (“shall never cease”) in the above verse recalls the term ein sof (“endlessness,” or “the Infinite One”), the idiom in Kabbalah expressing G-d’s essential existence beyond time and space. (The initial letters of ein sof, the alef and samech,are also the first two letters in Esther’s name.) It is interesting to note that we find an idiomatic expression of eternity in each of the three places where the Bible explicitly recounts the campaign against Amalek: In the Pentateuch itself, where Moses and Joshua lead the battle, we are told of “G-d’s war against Amalek from generation to generation” (Exodus 17:16); in the Prophets, where Samuel contends with the Amalekite King, Agag, we encounter the Divine appelation referred to above–Netzach Yisrael, the Eternity of Israel; and in the Ketuvim, where Mordechai and Esther vanquish the Amalekite Haman, we have the expression just mentioned, lo yasuf.

Hence we see that the concept of netzach is implicit throughout the book of Esther. It can be said that it “surrounds” the book as well–for we find explicit reference to the term both before and after the book is formally read on the holiday of Purim. The prior reference appears in context of the haftarah (“appended Scriptural portion”) read on the Sabbath before the Purim holiday, in which the central verse (Samuel 15:29) reads: “Netzach Yisrael lo yeshaker”–”the Eternity of Israel does not prevaricate.” The subsequent reference appears in the short elegy, “Shoshanat Yaakov,” which is recited after the book of Esther has been read in public. The word netzach appears there twice, in the sentence that reads teshuatam hayita lanetzach (“you were their eternal salvation”) and in that which reads lo yekalmu lanetzach kol hachosim bach (“those who find refuge in You shall for all of eternity never be humiliated”).

Hence, in one form or another, all of the sefirot are hinted at in the Megillah, establishing a unique connection between this most esoteric of Scriptural texts and the Kabbalistic tradition as a whole.

Sarah Lives, and who else because of her?

All the portions begin with deeply encrypted messages and these are the seed level energies imparted to us weekly, which is why Torah was split into these specific and very uneven portions in the first place. This portion, Chayei Sarah, the 5th in the Torah and the 55th paragraph in the Torah begins seemingly simple enough. Aryeh Kaplan translates the 12 words of the portion’s first verse (Genesis 23:1) as “Sarah had lived to be 127 years old. These were the years of Sarah’s life.” Perhaps a more accurate translation is as the Zohar states it: “And Sarah was one hundred year and twenty year and seven years old; the years of Sarah’s life.”

Let’s examine the verse more closely.

The verse begins with the palindromic word “וַיִּהְיוּ” meaning “And there were….” or “and they became” If we change the vowel of the first vav to Shva (two vertical dots) the meaning becomes “and they will be.” This is interesting because the rare palindromic nature of this word indicates a coming and going in two different directions, future and past.

The first four words in the verse reads like this “וַיִּהְיוּ חַיֵּי שָׂרָה, מֵאָה” and the total gematria of these 4 words is 616, the same numerical value as התורה, “The Torah.” The numerical value of the second word in the verse is 28 (as in the value of Koach, power), but it turns out that 616 = 28 x 22 and that the name Sarah is mentioned without prefixes 28 times in The Torah and 22 times through this verse. And that’s probably just as coincidental as the fact that Moshe’s name is mentioned without prefixes exactly 616 times in “The Torah,” and of course that there are 22 letters in the aleph-bet.

The Name Sarah is found another 10 times for a total of 38 times in the Torah.

And we should keep in mind that the square root of 616 is 24.8 which happen to be the value of Abraham (248) and also Raziel.

While the numerical value of the first letters of the first 3 words is 314, as in PI, Shaddai and Mettatron, the last letters of the first four words of the verse, permute to the Tetragrammaton, “י׃ה׃ו׃ה” so obviously there’s lots of substance here.

The first 9 letters out of the 45 letters in the verse add up to a value of 365, and as in the value of the letter Shin ש., spelled out, השין, or “The Shin” while 45 plus 300, the numerical value of shin, is 300 + 45 = 345, the numerical value of Moshe. Including the 8 in this verse , there are 1424 Shins in the Torah, with 1000 being representative of Keter and 424 being the value of Mashiach ben David.

There are also 9 letter Yuds י in the verse. And the complete numerical value of Shin-Yud including its ordinal value is 310 + 31 = 341, which is the numerical value of the 3 Mother letters, Alef, Shin and Mem אמש. We’ve previously linked Abraham and Sarah to the 3 Mothers with Sarah representing the Shin ש. Up to this verse, there are 3142 yuds in the Torah and 3142 is the small gematria value of Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh, “I Am that I am,” which represents the upper 42 letters of the Name of G-d, etc. The central shin of this all-important phrase, becomes the 9th shin of this verse and balances out the 9 yuds.

4 of those 9 י yuds are in the 1st two words and together the 4 yuds sum to 40, and often 4 yuds in a verse are associated with special healing properties, like the 4 yuds in the שמע־ישראל Shma Israel.. and in the Shem Mem-Bet (שם־מ״ב) (Ana B’koach אנא־בכח). We also know that the name Moshe forms one of the 72 triplets (Names ע״ב־שמות), the 5th one (מהש MHSh), and is also associated with healing properties.

So looking at the first 3 words again: “וַיִּהְיוּ חַיֵּי שָׂרָה” we can extrapolate the 4 yuds to be a Mem as in Moshe, The Shin of Sarah forms the Shin of Moshe, and the He of Sarah also passes to Moshe, spelling מהש MHSh and leaving והרוח, “v’h’ruach” meaning “and the spirit of Moshe.” So it’s not far fetched to presume that the verse is stating that Sarah will live through the spirit of Moshe. Especially since the verse then states that Sarah lived 100 year and 20 year, which makes 120 years together, which was the lifespan of Moshe. Thus we have Sarah will live through the spirit of Moshe for 120 years.

It also then adds 7 years, which we all know represents Zeir Anpin and Malchut, the lower 7 sefirot (dimensions). The total of 127 years is interesting for several reasons. First, because there are 127 possible combinations of 7 items (letters, doubles, etc) and secondly because we know from chazal that Sarah reincarnated as Queen Ester who ruled over 127 nations, which is interesting because the atbash isאת־בש of Sarah (שרה) has the numerical value of 95, as does Malcah מלכה, Queen.

But in going back to the first few words again and looking at the 2nds, 3rd and 4th words, “חַיֵּי שָׂרָה, מֵאָה” an taking out the משה of Moshe, we’re left with הארי־חי, “The Ari Lives.” The word ordinal value of the 9 letter sequence that spells out this cryptic message about the Arizal, (2nd+3rd+4th = 9) leads us to 9 again, a recurrent theme in this verse.

Another recurrent theme is 5, as in the 5th portion and 55th paragraph and Sarah’s name’s value, 505, and since we know every little detail in the Torah has significant meaning and a purpose beyond our vision, we should note that the numerical value of “Ari” is 211, as in the the verse Bereshit 21:1 that prophesied about the Messiah’s arrival, and that there are 125 occurrences of words with the numerical value 211 in the Torah, and 125 = 5 x 5 x 5. Moreover, permuted versions of the 3 letters in Ari that form actual words occur in the Torah exactly 18 times, as in the numerical value of chai, “lives,” once again pointing to The Ari Lives. And how many of those occur through this verse? 5, of course.

We know from chazal the Ari was an incarnation of Moshe Rabbeinu so how interesting is it that the first word in the verse and parsha can be translated as “and they became.” And it was the Arizal himself who went into a lengthy discourse on the connection of this verse to Abraham’s 175 years and the 370 lights of Arich Anpin, but what he didn’t tell us was that seeing as Abraham was 137 at the time of Sarah’s death, Abraham lived another (175-137) = 38 years, and that’s how long the Ari lived, which is turns out is the same amount of times Sarah’s name is mentioned in the Torah. So the verse becomes, not Sarah lived for 127 years, but Moshe will live for 120 years and the Ari for 38 years.

And we know from chazal that the last letters in phrase speak to the future, so how fitting is it that the last letters in all 12 words of the verse add up to 211. as in the numerical value of “Ari

And so we ask, what does the 9 recurrences in this verse of the Shin and the yud have to do with the Ari. We can see that they are central to the word, Mashiachשיח), but as the Torah draws us deeper, we see that the value of the spelled out Shin and Yud add up to 360 + 20 = 380 and 380 is not only 38 x 10 (sefirot), but 380 is the numerical value for Egypt (Mizra’im) from whence came the Ari.

And simply, while the last letters of the first four words equaled the Tetragrammaton “י׃ה׃ו׃ה”, the last letters of those 4 words, indicating the future and as we’ve seen pointing to Moshe Rabbeinu and the Arizal add up to 358, when the kolel of 4 is included, and 358 is the numerical value of the Mashiach, the messiah. And do not forget that the 4 points to the 4 exiles, which B”H will be coming to an end very soon.

So we must ask is the ש in Mashiach (משיח) also attributed to Sarah. משיח could equal מש־חי “From Shin lives

There are many more secrets contained in this verse, which we’ll leave for another time. including the connection to Daniel 12:7, and also how the 3 Mothers, 7 doubles and 12 elementals play into the verse as they control the cosmos.

The word shana שנה (year) has the numerical value of 355, the same as sefira (dimension), which is what led chazal to connect the 100 years to the dimension of Keter and the 20 years links to keter through the caf whose value is 20 and through the word twenty (עשרים) whose value is 620, which is also the value of keter (כתר),

As an additional note: The numerical value of “100 year (מֵאָה שָׁנָה)” is 46+355 = 401. and if we add the kolel for the 6 letters we get 401 + 6 = 407, whose square root is 20.17424 (2017 424) or the combined values of Mashiach ben David (424) in the year 2017. And then there is the last 7 years, whose numerical value (וְשֶׁבַע שָׁנִים) is 778 as in 5778, which begins in 2017 and is perhaps meaningful.